Defend your choice, paragraph development

Paragraphs & Hamburger Metaphor

Paragraphs & Hamburger Metaphor (Photo credit: Geoffery Kehrig)

Paragraph Development, 2nd edition, 1990 Prentice Hall, Inc.,
Martin L. Arnaudet, Mary Ellen Barrett, English Language Institute,
The American University, Washington, D.C.
Lesson 1 The Topic Sentence, Paragraph Unity

Exercise 1-5, Identifying Irrelevant Sentences
(a.) The following paragraph contain sentences which are not directly related to the main ideas of those paragraphs.
Exercise:
1. The general population often resists innovations, whether practical or aesthetic. 2. When the early experiments in the field of aviation began their work, there were many who said, “If God had wanted man to fly, He would have given him wings.” 3. The Wright brothers made the first powered flights in a heavier-than-air craft in 1903 at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. 4. Even today there are many who strongly object to modern art and music as being nothing more than “splashes of paint and honking horns.” 5. The painter Picasso’s well-known masterpiece “The Three Musicians” is done primarily in blues and browns.

(a.1) The key words or phrases in the topic sentence: resists innovations, practical or aesthetic
(a.2) The irrelevant sentences to be rid of from the paragraph: 3, 5

Exercise 1-6, Identifying Suitable Topic Sentences
(b.) Select the most suitable topic sentence from the three choices, then try to explain why each of the other two items is not appropriate. Possible reasons:
It is too general.
It is too specific.
It is not a complete grammatical sentence.
It does not relate to the supporting sentences.

C. Despite apparent differences, the operation of the computer and the telephone have much in common. The operation of both devices can be thought of as being divided into three phases: input, processing and output. In the case of the computer, the information which is fed into the machine — the data — is the input; the internal operations of the machine constitute the processing; and the result — usually a printout — is called the output. The telephone, too, acts on information presented to it and produces a result. The input is the actual dialing of the number. The switching system which locates the number can be considered the processing phase. Finally, the telephone rings on the other end of the line, indicating that the call has been completed; this constitutes the output.

B. Computer terminology, such as input and output, is frequently used in other contexts. The operation of both devices can be thought of as being divided into three phases: input, processing and output. In the case of the computer, the information which is fed into the machine — the data — is the input; the internal operations of the machine constitute the processing; and the result — usually a printout — is called the output. The telephone, too, acts on information presented to it and produces a result. The input is the actual dialing of the number. The switching system which locates the number can be considered the processing phase. Finally, the telephone rings on the other end of the line, indicating that the call has been completed; this constitutes the output.

(b.1) Choose a Topic Sentence
A. Both the computer and the telephone are helpful inventions.
B. Computer terminology, such as input and output, is frequently used in other contexts.
C. Despite apparent differences, the operation of the computer and the telephone have much in common.

(b.2) Defend Your Choice
1. I did not choose letter A because it does not relate to the supporting sentences(which are describing the three phases of the operation of both the computer and the telephone).
2. I did not not choose letter B because it is not a complete grammatical sentence.
NB. If B. states without the ending “is frequently used in other contexts” to be as this “The words such as input and output are computer terminology,” we can choose to defend that the reason not to choose B. is because it it too specific.
3. (Optional) I did not choose letter C because                                                          .

DB, December 4, 2012

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